O açaí e abertohihe

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Is the Å an a or an AA?

If the Å is represented as a common A without the overring (e.g. “www.rade.com”) there is no indication that the A is supposed to represent another sound entirely. Even so, representing the Å as just an A is particularly common in Sweden, as compared to Norway and Denmark, because the spelling Aa has no traditional use there.

What is the correct way to sort AA in Danish?

In Danish the correct sorting of aa depends on pronunciation – if the sound is pronounced as one sound it is sorted as Å regardless of the sound is ‘a’ or ‘å’; thus, for example, the German city Aachen is listed under Å, as well as the Danish city Aabenraa. This is § 3 in the Danish Retskrivningsreglerne.

Why did Aarhus change its name to AA?

Between 1948 and 2010, the city of Aarhus was officially spelled Århus. However, the city has changed to the Aa spelling starting 2011, in a controversial decision citing internationalization and web compatibility advantages. Icelandic and Faroese are the only North Germanic languages not to use the å.

What is the origin of AA in the Bible?

A similar process was used to construct a new grapheme where an “aa” had previously been used. A minuscule O was placed on top of an A to create a new letter. It was first used in print in the Gustav Vasa Bible that was published in 1541 and replaced Aa in the 16th century.

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Como a maioria dos sites, Alcoólicos Anônimos (BR) usa cookies. Para oferecer um serviço personalizado e ágil e para melhorar o site, lembramos e armazenamos informações sobre como você o usa. Isso é feito usando arquivos de texto simples chamados cookies que ficam no seu computador. Ao usar este site, você concorda com este princípio.


Quando usar à?

Quando a vogal a é escrita com acento grave (à) indica que ocorre crase, ou seja, que ocorre a contração de duas vogais idênticas. A contração mais comum é a da preposição a com o artigo definido feminino a. Assim, a contração à nunca é utilizada antes de uma palavra masculina ou de uma palavra que não se determina, como um verbo.


Quando usar há?

Há é a forma conjugada do verbo haver na 3.ª pessoa do singular do presente do indicativo. É usada quando o verbo haver atua como um verbo impessoal, sem sujeito, devendo, assim, ser conjugado sempre na 3.ª pessoa do singular.

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Overview

The letter Å (å in lower case) represents various (although often very similar) sounds in several languages. It is a separate letter in Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, North Frisian, Low Saxon, Walloon, Chamorro, Lule Sami, Pite Sami, Skolt Sami, Southern Sami, Ume Sami, and Greenlandic alphabets. Additionally, it is part of the alphabets used for some Alemannic and Austro-Bavarian dialects of German.


Scandinavian languages

The Å-sound originally had the same origin as the long /aː/ sound in German Aal and Haar (Scandinavian ål, hår).
Historically, the å derives from the Old Norse long /aː/ vowel (spelled with the letter á), but over time, it developed to an [ɔː] sound in most Scandinavian language varieties (in Swedish and Norwegian, it has eventually reached the pronunciation [oː]). Medieval writing often used double…


Finnish

Because the Finnish alphabet is derived from the Swedish alphabet, Å is carried over, but it has no native Finnish use and is treated as in Swedish. Its usage is limited to loanwords and names of Swedish, Danish or Norwegian origin. In Finland there are many Swedish-speaking as well as many Finnish-speaking people with Swedish surnames, and many Swedish surnames include Å. In ad…


Emilian-Romagnol

In Emilian-Romagnol, å is used to represent the open-mid back unrounded vowel [ʌ], e.g. Modenese dialect åmm, dånna [ˈʌmː], [ˈdʌnːa] “man, woman”;
e.g. Bolognese dialect Bulåggna, dåpp [buˈlʌɲːa] [ˈdʌpː] “Bologna, later”.


Walloon

Å was introduced to some eastern local variants of Walloon at the beginning of the 16th century and initially noted the same sound as in Danish. Its use quickly spread to all eastern dialects, under the cultural influence of Liège and covered three sounds, a long open o, a long close o or a long a, depending on the local varieties. The use of a single å letter to cover such pronunciations has been embraced by the new pan-Walloon orthography, with one orthography for words regard…


Istro-Romanian

The Istro-Romanian alphabet is based on the standard Romanian alphabet with three additional letters used to mark sounds specific only to this language: å, ľ and ń.


Chamorro

Å and å are also used in the practical orthography of Chamorro, a language indigenous to the people of Northern Mariana Islands and Guam. The Chamorro name for Guam is Guåhån, and its capital is called Hagåtña.


Greenlandic

In Greenlandic, å is not used in native words, but is used in several loanwords from Danish, such as båndoptageri (Danish båndoptager) ‘tape recorder’. Like in Danish, å is sorted last in the alphabet.

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